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Facts & Figures

Documents about military, recruitment and war realities.

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57 ASVAB-testing-data-2008 -2009-by-state

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is the military's entrance exam that is given to prospective recruits to determine their aptitude for various military occupations. The four-hour test is also used by military recruiting services to gain valuable information on hundreds of thousands of high school students across the country every year, the vast majority of whom are under the age of 18. In many cases, students take the test without parental knowledge or consent. Unless the school that is used for the testing requests "Option 8" for reporting purposes, information from each test is given to local military recruiters to be able to conduct more effective sales pitches to our youth.

The data provided on this page details, by State or Territory, each school with the numbers of students that have been tested under each ASVAB option during the 2008-2009 school year.

Source: Rogue Valley Peace Veterans

1 ASVAB-testing-data-2009 -2010- National

Although it took a lot of interface with MEPCOM to get this batch of data and then it came in without city ID for the schools in the states. However, we have added preliminary Option selection data support (in bold blue) for each state and, in some cases where curiousity lead us to some minimal data reduction. What would also be useful is some additional work (such as we did for our home state of Oregon), to denote those schools that require the test be given to each student (anything in the "Mandatory" column), coupled with the less-than-Option 8 notations, again, such as we have done for Oregon.

It should be noted that, despite the miserable showing of 0% Option 8 for some states (examples: ME, AZ, MO, LA and SD, with all "territories" in the same category) , the '08-'09 over-all Option 8 participation was 8.6% of all students tested, while the '09-'10 participations edged up to 12.2%. Another item of note is that anywhere a JROTC is identified as being in a school, all ASVAB testing seems automatically to be "Option 1," reflecting the strong military leaning at that school.

Source: Rogue Valley Peace Veterans

1 ASVAB-testing-data-2008 -2009- National

The Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) is the military's entrance exam that is given to prospective recruits to determine their aptitude for various military occupations. The four-hour test is also used by military recruiting services to gain valuable information on hundreds of thousands of high school students across the country every year, the vast majority of whom are under the age of 18. In many cases, students take the test without parental knowledge or consent. Unless the school that is used for the testing requests "Option 8" for reporting purposes, information from each test is given to local military recruiters to be able to conduct more effective sales pitches to our youth.

The data provided on this page details, Nationally each State or Territory, each school with the numbers of students that have been tested under each ASVAB option during the 2008-2009 school year.

Source: Rogue Valley Peace Veterans

DocumentsDate added

Order by : Name | Date | Hits | [ Descendent ]

The state data was created from the national database received on December 18, 2013 from Yasmeen Hargis, FOIA Analyst For Suzanne Council, Senior Advisor on behalf of Paul J. Jacobsmeyer, Chief, Freedom of Information Office of the Secretary of Defense and Joint Staff FOIA Request Service Center http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/
1155 Defense Pentagon Washington, DC 20301-1155.  (See explanation below regarding Release Options)

The Special Instructions column in the state data corresponds to the release options in USMEPCOM Regulation 601-4, Table 3-1. See the description of the option followed by our comments in italics.

Option 1 Test information is provided to recruiting services no sooner than 7 days after mailed to school. (If a school neglects to select a release option USMEPCOM will select Option 1.  Many, if not most school administrators in the country still don't know about ASVAB release options despite our efforts. Option 1 accounts for 53.08% of the total)

Option 2 Test information is provided to recruiting services no sooner than 60 days after mailed to school. (USMEPCOM still receives test results. They can't use the information until the potential recruit turns 18 so the waiting period is inconsequential.  Most of the students who take the test are Juniors. Option 2 accounts for 6.34% of the total

Option 3 Test information is provided to recruiting services no sooner than 90 days after mailed to school. (Same as above - Option 3 accounts for 1.37% of the total.)

Option 4 Test information is provided to recruiting services no sooner than 120 days after mailed to school. (Same as above - Option 4 accounts for .74% of the total.)

Option 5 Test information is provided to recruiting services no sooner than the end of the SY for that specific school or 30 June (Same as above - Option 5 accounts for 5.20% of the total.)

Option 6 Test information is provided to recruiting services no sooner than 7 days after mailed to school with instruction that no telephone solicitation by recruiters will be conducted as a result of test information provided.  (Recruiters have many other options.  Option 6 accounts for 4.67% of the total.)

Option 7 Invalid test results. Student test information is not provided to recruiting services. (This option has become much more popular in the last few years.  It is typically associated with testing 10th graders. ASVAB results may be used for enlistment purposes for up to 2 years. - Option 7 accounts for 13.56% of the total. 12,666 11th and 12th graders were also listed as being tested under Option 7.)

Option 8 Access to student test information is not provided to recruiting services. (Option 8 accounts for 15.04% of the total.)

Pew ReportsAs the U.S. marks the 10th anniversary of the longest period of sustained warfare in its history, the vast majority of veterans of the post-9/11 era are proud of their military service and say it has helped them mature as human beings. However most  have philosophical conflicts with the wars they are fighting.

Report has much statistical data with supporting charts.

The Real U.S. National Security BudgetWelcome to the world of the real U.S. national security budget.  Normally, in media accounts, you hear about the Pentagon budget and the war-fighting supplementary funds passed by Congress for our conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.  That already gets you into a startling price range -- close to $700 billion for 2012 -- but that’s barely more than half of it.  If Americans were ever presented with the real bill for the total U.S. national security budget, it would actually add up to more than $1.2 trillion a year.

Source: National Priorities Project

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